Articles Posted in Supreme Court of Illinois

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Christopher B. Burke Engineering, Ltd. (Burke Engineering) filed a complaint to foreclose on a mechanics lien on property owned by Carol and Glen Harkins. Heritage Bank of Central Illinois had a mortgage interest in the property. The circuit court invalidated the lien on grounds that the requirements for a mechanics lien set forth in section 1 of the Mechanics Lien Act were not met. Specifically, the court found that the services provided by Burke Engineering did not constitute an improvement to the property and that the provision of services was not induced or encouraged by the property owner. The appellate court affirmed. Burke Engineering argued on appeal to the Supreme Court that the circuit court erred in granting Heritage Bank’s motion for summary judgment. After review, the Supreme Court reversed. Because Burke Engineering’s services were done for the purpose of improving the property, the services were lienable. However, it was unclear whether Carol Schenck, owner of the property at the time the contract for services was entered into, knowingly permitted Harkins to enter into contracts regarding the property. Because the resolution of this issue involved unanswered material questions of fact, Heritage Bank was not entitled to summary judgment. View "Christopher B. Burke Engineering, Ltd v. Heritage Bank of Central Illinois" on Justia Law

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Henderson Square Condominium Association sued the developers, alleging: breach of the implied warranty of habitability, fraud, negligence, breach of the Chicago Municipal Code’s prohibition against misrepresenting material facts in the course of marketing and selling real estate. The court dismissed with prejudice, finding that plaintiffs failed to adequately plead the Chicago Municipal Code violation and breach of fiduciary duty and that those counts were time-barred. The appellate court reversed the dismissal of those counts and the Illinois Supreme Court affirmed. The claims at issue are construction-related and governed by the limitation and repose of section 13-214 of the Code of Civil Procedure, but the fraud exception applied and issues of material fact remained concerning misrepresentations or actions that could support a finding of fraudulent concealment. The defendants were alleged to be “more than silent” regarding insulation and funding of the reserves. The Municipal Code allows private parties to seek damages under its provisions and there were allegations that defendants had a fiduciary duty to budget for reasonable reserves, given allegedly known latent defects. View "Henderson Square Condo. Assoc'n v. LAB Townhomes, LLC" on Justia Law